Aditya

  • Aditya | 01-Dec-2019
    I really, really don’t care if women call me regressive, or prehistoric or whatever they want to call me. I will say this again and again and again and keep saying this because I care! Our country is socially, morally, economically and in every other perceivable sense not ready to give the kind of freedom, equality and safe passage that women expect or observe in developed nations (I don’t know is such thing exists in other countries but let’s assume it does). I have no idea how we are going to be a better society neither do I know how long it will take for us to get there. What I do know is, safety starts with understanding the constrains that we live in. If you are walking a tightrope with blazing flames or a thousand-meter gorge underneath, then it is foolish, senseless and naïve to dance on that rope. For your own sake, please find that balance. Self-defense, support system, better law enforcement and all of that is “after” you encounter an unfortunate incident. What
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  • Aditya | 03-Dec-2019
    As a kid, did my parents or elders around me teach me to respect women? Is there a written procedure to follow? A mutually agreeable protocol? I guess not. Parents can share a few good things from their perspective but I believe, by and large kids observe adults around them and emulate their behaviour. That's how we learn, that's how we grow.   While growing up, I also realised that, few things men and women in my family did were wrong. As teenagers we have immense sensitivity to notice these things but not necessarily the maturity to process it. We see things in society that we don’t agree with but lack the skill to articulate our feelings or the power to influence.   But as we become adults we are supposed to have gained that wisdom to work on these inputs. Do we consciously work on it or do we continue to unconsciously emulate our ancestors? Do we merely reflect the society by being one of them or have what it takes to form an individual stand?   These are roughly the three stage
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  • Aditya | 03-Dec-2019
    No one wishes to talk about it, everyone want justice served cold, right now! I don’t contest that, we are all angry and sad and scared. Maybe a severe punishment to one will be a deterrent to another, that is what we expect. I am no legal expert or a psychologist or a statistician, I am one of you, a son, brother, husband, father, and I am as clueless as you are but I do have an unpopular opinion and I will express it. A person who is privileged to have three square meals may also seek more, greed has no limits. However, there is a possibility that such a person can be taught to overcome greed, it is possible to convince him that his desire to have more is unhealthy, dangerous. Whether the greedy person understands it for his own good and that of the society is another story, but all I am saying is that there is ray of hope in this case. On the other hand, there is another person who is starving, he is broke, homeless fellow. He has had no food for days, he is scavenging to survive. He can beg, borro
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  • Who are you?
    Aditya | 17-Dec-2019
    हिंदू शिकार है इस्लामी आतंक का, मुसलमान शिकार है हिंदू राष्ट्रवाद का। उच्चवर्ग शिकार है बढ़ाते आरक्षण का, पिछड़ावर्ग शिकार है घटते आरक्षण का। स्त्री शिकार है पितृसत्ता का, पुरुष शिकार है नारीवाद का। मालिक शिकार है ख़राब कार्य कुशलता का, मजदूर शिकार है शोषण का। डॉक्टर शिकार है मरीज़ों की बढ़ती आक्रामकता का, मरीज़ शिकार है अस्पतालों से होती हुई लूट का। प्रशासन शिकार है नारेबाजी का, समाज शिकार है लाठीबाज़ी का। वकील शिकार है पुलिस की तानाशाही का, पुलिस शिकार है वकीलों की गुंडागर्दी का। छात्र शिकार है अनुशासन का, शिक्षक शिकार है अनुशासनहीनता का। कलाकार शिकार है अभिवेचन का, नियामक शिकार है अभिव्यक्ति का। शहरी शिकार है गिरते पेड़ो का, ग्रामीण शिकार है गिरते विकास का। यह तो बस चंद उदाहरण है, गिनने बैठोगे तो ख़तम नहीं होंगे शिकार होने के कारण। एक बात ठीक से समज़ह लो प्यारे, समाज व्यवस्था का, इंसान का, संप्रदाय का, सामूहिक राय का या किसीभी चीज़ का शिकार होना, या यूँ कहे ये "सोचना" की हम शिकार है, ये केवल एक मानसिकता है। आप तब भी शिकार थे जब वो सरकार थी, आप आजभी शिकार है जब ये सरकार है, और अगर आप अपनी मानसिकता नहीं बदलेंगे तो आ
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  • Catalysts and chain reactions
    Aditya | 22-Dec-2019
    Catalyst is a substance which increases the rate of a chemical reaction without getting consumed in the reaction. Lot of people known as "social media influencers" feel that they are "catalyst" and they can trigger a reaction without getting consumed in it. They tend to overlook that in some cases a reactive by-product causes additional reactions to take place triggering a sequence of events called as "chain reaction". Be very aware that once you trigger a chain reaction, there is no escaping the snowball effect. Be careful, learn a thing or two and have a wonderful Sunday, on Monday you have to hit the streets.
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  • Bliss
    Aditya | 24-Dec-2019
    If you are driving a car.., on a particularly pleasant evening.., with someone sitting next to you.., and listening to a song on the stereo, if you are getting goosebumps.., your eyes are getting moist.., you are having a lump in your throat., and you are shivering with that feeling…   Then you turn around..,  see that the person sitting next to you.., is going through exactly the same set of feelings.., then my dear you are in a state of absolute bliss..!
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  • Aditya | 06-Jan-2020
    To, The broadcaster, the standup comedian, the actor, the activist, the guru and the social media influencer   STOP IT! NOW! If you do not, then you are as much a criminal as the one indulging in arson, rather you are a bigger criminal. An individual can pelt a stone or two, one can torch a bus or two, but you people are lynching and burning sensitive minds. Stop it. Yes, you are better read, maybe you are better informed, yes you are far more intelligent than the average person, happy? But you are biased and indulgent and insensitive and it is visible, it is obvious! Remember, the ability to remain tolerant to provocation varies from person to person. One may find your critique logical, another may not but shall remain steadfast, yet another may ignore and laugh back and then there will be someone who will talk back and debate. But, a major section of our society neither has linguistic ability nor the domain knowledge to counter your provocation. This section will keep quiet, they will keep burnin
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  • Super structures
    Aditya | 07-Jan-2020
    The only election I ever contested was for being the class monitor in 10th standard, which I lost to a very good friend of mine. No shame in accepting that he was a better student in every way; polite, studious, humorous, friendly, good in sports and good in arts. Of course he was excellent in subjects and ranked in the top three. He was the better choice and our fellow students knew it and did well to vote for him. It did not matter what his name was, which caste and which religion he belonged to. All that mattered was competence. Oh and it didn’t matter whether the kid was a he or a she. A few years later some of us batch mates met for dinner, by then we were doing well with our respective careers and pursuits. Couple of drinks down and having indulged in nostalgia for a long time, the conversation slowly drifted to films, then to cricket and finally to politics. One of our friend who was connected with a political party took the lead and the conversation quickly turned unpleasant. He kept on talking
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  • Aditya | 12-Jan-2020
    Stereotyping has become a part of our life. More often than not we do it subconsciously and sometimes we do it knowingly. Either way, it has become difficult for us to accept things as they are. People, places, things, thoughts everything has to fall in this or that bucket and art is no exception. So which bucket do we put Chhappak in? Is it a tragedy? Is it a quest? Is it rebirth? Is it rags to riches? It can be anything or a bit of everything. Try and park the urge to assign a category, try and accept the film with a clean perspective without expecting cliché of the genre, only then there is a possibility that you will be able to see Chhappak for what it is. For it is just a story that needs to be told, as it is...! I came out of the theater obviously troubled, scared and concerned. But not once during the entire run time did I cry, and let me tell you I cry easily. Not once did I experience shock, not once did I felt like closing my eyes. There have been insensitive films where heinous crimes are
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  • Colors in art
    Aditya | 17-Feb-2020
    I understand the commercial compulsion. It has become nearly impossible for film makers (and artists at large) to keep their art independent of commerce and hence a lot of films we see these days are monochrome. Firmly dipped in a saffron or green or blue and now the newly emerging or shall we say reemerging red, the chosen color complements the product’s (art?) positioning. The choice of color isn’t a subtle watermark anymore; these films are blatantly opaque. There is no chance of any light passing through, everything is reflected back in the same color. I am unwilling to call these products work of art, these are mere propaganda tools. The other extreme is the transparent film. Very rare to find, we will have to go back in time or broaden our search to find such gems. We know it when we see such film, because it stands out in its brilliant transparency. The work is clear, it is sharp, the expression is independent of any ad-hoc riders and it allows us to witness the full spectrum of color. It
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  • Aditya | 19-Feb-2020
    Few years back a friend asked me this question, trust me it was a very genuine question, there was no malice in it, he asked; “I have read history books as well, why do you Marathi folks revere Chatrapati Shivaji Maharaj as if he is God incarnate? I don’t see you guys following his footsteps, but you use his name to bully us, those from out of state, why?” I will share the answer here for all my non-Marathi friends. First the politically tricky part; Do we directly or indirectly bully non-Marathi people by leveraging his name? First and foremost, Chatrapati Shivaji Maharaj isn’t just a Marathi King, he is an Indian King who represents all of us and our shared way of life. Now do you feel we bully you? Yes, if you feel so! Let me clarify, the show of strength symbolized by the excessive worship of our beloved King, which you misunderstand as bullying, is just a reminder of our tolerance. If you perceive it as bullying, then it is because deep down you know that your aggression has g
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  • Aditya | 04-Mar-2020
    Honestly I am very judgmental about people bringing young kids in cinema halls to watch mature content. I do understand that the “parental guidance” category exists where adults are supposed to steer their “impressionable young adults” such that they understand the complexities. But here I was surrounded by adults who themselves were clueless about the gravity of the narrative? On my left were three middle aged men who were initially amused, then a bit shocked but who eventually went silent. One of them kept exhaling long breaths as if exhausted with what he saw. At least these people had the sensitivity to digest what they saw, something that must be difficult to process given the decades of conditioning they must have gone through. Maybe they were watching from the parent’s perspective. Behind me was an all-girl group. They kept on chatting throughout the film and passed comments on every scene. I looked behind a couple of times giving them an irritated look but they had this
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  • Aditya | 22-Mar-2020
    It was day 4 of the course. By then I had overcome the fluctuating mental resolve, the ups and downs most students experience. The night before, one of the students had scaled the wall and ran away, unable to endure the process anymore. Not that we were not warned before. On day zero the teacher did brief us, “this course is like a surgery, once you commit to it, you have to go through it till the stitches are done, you cannot just abandon the process half way, with your mind opened up’’. Yet the fellow had run away, but I had managed to devise a strategy of my own. “Two test matches, back to back and one session at a time”, I had told myself. It helped me to break it down into smaller tasks and tackle it one at a time, allowing me small victories. So it was day 4 and having spent three days learning and practicing the Anapana technique, finally it was time to learn Vipassana. I was eager to know what the big deal was. I had heard stories about people discovering their chakras
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  • Aditya | 09-Jun-2020
    Most decisions are either celebrated or ridiculed in retrospect..! While nobody makes a conscious decision to fail, only a minuscule few are made with strong anticipation of success. Even then it is just a judgement call and not a sure shot prophecy of success. Much later such decisions are praised as visionary, rest are criticised. But as I said the jury assessment happens much later, with the comfort and cushioning of data and other historical evidence. As Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw said, “For someone to be a good leader, the key is to take a decision and then accept full responsibility for it. An incorrect decision can be corrected, indecision cannot be..!” What separates, rather elevates a person from the stature of an analyst to that of a leader is this little intangible ability to make a decision, at the point when it matters, despite the analyst’s best effort to paralyse the process with conflicting data. Look around, do you see analysts masquerading as leaders or do you see some
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